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Fibre

Australian Merino wool is a natural fibre that comes from Merino sheep, which are distinctively suited to Australia’s landscape and climate. The wellbeing of these Merino sheep is reflected in their premium fleeces, showing the tireless work of woolgrowers to maintain the health and welfare of their animals, as well as preserve the land on which their sheep graze.

Across the country close to 71 million sheep roam freely in grasslands, where around three quarters of this flock are Australian Merinos. Each year sheep naturally produce a new fleece, and it’s for this reason that wool is an inherently renewable fibre. Australian Merino wool is perfect for apparel because these premium fibres are extremely fine. Wool fibres are composed of a natural protein called keratin, similar to that of human hair though are around three times finer. This means that fabrics made from Merino wool feel soft, comfortable and luxurious. Merino wool is also elastic and strong due to the structure of the fibre, giving wool the upper hand for both drape and tailoring.

Wool fibres are breathable and react to the body’s changing temperature. You only need to think for a moment about the climate in which Merino sheep live to understand that Australian Merino wool naturally adapts to both the heat and the cold. When a Merino wool garment has reached the end of this wear, it can be added to organic compost, as wool fibres are completely biodegradable. Wool rapidly decomposes in soil and even acts like a natural fertiliser in the process by releasing nitrogen-rich nutrients back into the earth.

Fibre

The history of Merino wool

Wool has been used in clothing for millennia: from primitive man first clothing himself in the woolly skins of wild sheep - through the civilisation of Babylonia where people first distinguished wool sheep from food sheep - through Roman times when there were definite signs of selective breeding for a superior fleece - and through to the ascendancy of wool during the Middle Ages in Europe. By the late eighteenth century, the Industrial Revolution began a movement which took the textile industry from the home into the workshop and factory.

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The Woolmark Company has created a suite of fact sheets, explaining the science behind wool's naturally inherent benefits along with the fibre's impact on the environment.

Factsheets
20 Apr 2018

Wool is naturally breathable - Factsheet

20 Apr 2018
19 Feb 2018

Wool is good for the skin - Factsheet

19 Feb 2018
19 Feb 2018

Measuring Wool's Environmental Footprint - Factsheet

19 Feb 2018
17 Dec 2017

Wool is naturally odour resistant - Factsheet

17 Dec 2017

Fibre

Benefits of Wool

Australian wool is the first choice for many leading apparel designers and interior architects.
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Latest News
14 Aug 2018
Fibre

The Rising Tide of Microplastics

14 Aug 2018
As much as 35 per cent of microplastics in the marine environment are fibres from synthetic clothing, but by contrast, natural fibres such as wool readily biodegrade, offering a less impactful solution.
19 Jul 2018
Fibre

Reflection and inspiration at Milano Unica

19 Jul 2018
Merino wool continues to dominate apparel fibres, thanks to its natural benefits and important eco-credentials.
04 Jul 2018
Fibre

Pitti Filati 83

04 Jul 2018
The 83rd edition of Pitti Filati was a powerhouse of change and a place for serious research by designers and buyers, with wool continuing to play an important role.
10 Oct 2017
Fibre

Eat Your Wool

10 Oct 2017
A Swedish sportswear brand composts their own wool garments to grow food